Dhakaiya Profession

Tiffin Distributers

Posted in tiffin distributers by rrasheeka on April 21, 2009

Photography: Salman Saeed

In Old Dhaka there are a number of markets. In these markets there are many shopkeepers who sit there from the time they open the shop to the time the shop gets closed. Many of these shopkeepers don’t take their lunch with them from their homes. Have you ever wondered how they get their lunch?

They get their lunch from people who go to their homes,carry it from their to shops and give it to them. They are the tiffin distributers. These people work under a particular person with whom these shopkeepers make a contract. The shopkeepers pay to the people with whom they make the contract and the tiffin carriers are paid a fixed amount monthly by their employers. They are assigned a particular area in which they go from house to house and collect the tiffin boxes and then go to the markets and distribute the tiffin boxes.Most of the tiffin distributers are women who are middle-aged or above. This is probably because these women didn’t find any alternative source of income. We do not get to see these type of people in other parts of Dhaka. Only in Old Dhaka such a profession seems to exist. This is what is wonderful about Old Dhaka. There are such different types of professions that one comes across in that area.

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Clock and Watch Repairer- A Case study

Posted in Watch repairman by rrasheeka on April 17, 2009

Photography: Salman Saeed

Md. Atikullah looked at me with eyes that were filled with sadness. He has been a clock and watch repairer for the last 50 years. His shop was a very small cubic room just large enough to place a table and two chairs inside it. Clocks of many shapes and sizes were hanging from the walls of the shop. At the first glance the shop looked like an antique shop where old clocks were the choice of collection. But actually it was a shop were clocks and watches were repaired.

He started this work when he was around 20 years old. His uncle had taught him how to repair clocks. He loved repairing clocks and watches and he always wanted to take this up as a profession. But today, he feels sorry that he didn’t join some other profession which would give him a better income. He lives with his wife nearby his shop. Their children have grown-up, gotten married and started their own families. Day in and day out, Md. Atikullah sits in his shops waiting for people to come and ask him to repair their clocks or watches. But that rarely happens. Almost everyday, he opens his shop and sits their alone watching people go by doing their work. The nearby shopkeepers come and sit with him in his shop for a short time some of the days. This has become his everyday routine. The sad tale of this old man made me think how difficult life can become. This is no age for a man to worry about how to feed himself and his wife. But this man has to. Everyday is a struggle for him. A struggle for survival.

Clock and Watch Repairer

Posted in Watch repairman by rrasheeka on April 14, 2009

Photography: Salman Saeed

To be able to repair anything is to be able to master an art. Repairing,to me, is an art which requires a lot of patience and dedication. At one time, one of the major sources of income of the people living in Old Dhaka was by repairing things. Clock and Watch repairing was one such profession.

Although repairing clock and watches did not generate a large income, yet the income that was earned from it was enough to enable the repairer to feed his family properly. Life was not easy, but it wasn’t so difficult. Clocks and watches were expensive accessories then and so difficult to purchase. So the people brought their clocks and watches to be repaired if it gave them any trouble. But now, clocks and watches are available as well as affordable for most people. They hardly need to repair a watch or a clock if it doesn’t work properly. They can just buy a new one. Moreover, at one time, only Old Dhaka had watch repairers. Now there are watch repairers throughout the city. So, only the people who live in Old Dhaka get their watches repaired by the repairers of Old Dhaka. All these have resulted in the fall in demand for such people. With the very small income that they earn, their survival

Kitemaking-A Case Study

Posted in Kitemaking by rrasheeka on February 17, 2009

Photography: Salman Saeed

Watching his father make kites thrilled Faruq when he was very young. One day he asked his father to let him make a kite. Looking at his father making kites everyday had given little Faruq some idea on how a kite should be made. His father gave him the materials necessary to make a kite just to keep him busy. But Faruq successfully made the kite. He felt ecstatic.

Today, Faruq makes and sells kites as a profession. He is around 60 years old. Making kite has no longer remained a mere time-pass. It has become the source of his income. At 6 o’clock every morning, Faruq sits down to sell his kites and sells them till the sun sets. All the time he is waiting for the kites to sell,he also makes kites. Even after he goes home he makes kites. (more…)

Kitemaking

Posted in Kitemaking by rrasheeka on February 13, 2009

Photography: Salman Saeed.

A kite is a flying tethered aircraft that depends upon the tension of a tethering system.The necessary lift that makes the kite wing fly is generated when air (or in some cases water) flows over and under the kite’s wing, producing low pressure above the wing and high pressure below it. This deflection also generates horizontal drag long the direction of the wind. The resultant force vector from the lift and drag force components is opposed by the tension of the one or more lines or tethers. The anchor point of the kite line may be static or moving (e.g., the towing of a kite by a running person, boat,or vehicle).Kites may be flown for recreation, art or other practical uses.

Kites typically consist of one or more spars to which a paper or fabric sail is attached, although some, such as foil kites, have no spars at all. Classic kites use bamboo,rotten or some other strong but flexible wood for the spars, paper or light fabrics such as silk for the sails, and are flown on string or twine. Modern kites use synthetic materials, such as ripstop nylon or more exotic fabrics for the sails, fiberglass or carbon fiber for the spars and dacron or dyneema for the kite lines. (more…)